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Outer Banks’ June double play

Most fishermen along the North Carolina coast are familiar with cobia and Spanish mackerel, but few think of them as a combined fishery. 

Capt. Karl Helmkamp of Fistful Sportfishing in Manteo sees them that way, but not quite in the manner one might expect. He sees cobia as the primary target and Spanish mackerel as the secondary catch, rather than the other way around. 

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Featured

Jones’ bill to ease OBX restrictions passes House

The U.S. House of Representatives has passed a bill authored by Rep. Walter B. Jones Jr. that would relax beach-access restrictions on the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The bill will now go to the U.S. Senate, where a committee has reported favorably on a companion version sponsored by Sens. Kay Hagen and Richard Burr. No vote has been scheduled for the Senate bill. 

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Featured

Jones’ bill to ease OBX restrictions passes House

The U.S. House of Representatives has passed a bill authored by Rep. Walter B. Jones Jr. that would relax beach-access restrictions on the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The bill will now go to the U.S. Senate, where a committee has reported favorably on a companion version sponsored by Sens. Kay Hagen and Richard Burr. No vote has been scheduled for the Senate bill. 

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Offshore Fishing

Outer Banks head boat tips

• Check the weather before you go. Wind direction affects water clarity that can determine the fishing. For example, flounder bite better with clean water, while croakers and sea mullet bite better when the water is stained to dirty. […]

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Get The Point – ‘The Point’ off North Carolina’s Outer Banks is a bigeye tuna hotspot in May

Bigeye tuna occupy the offshore waters off North Carolina’s Outer Banks from spring through the summer, but most of the action is from the second week in May through June. About once every 10 years, large numbers of bigeyes show up all in the same place, with every boat for miles fishing for them and every boat having frequent hook-ups.

The numbers are enormous.

Bigeyes are bigger than yellowfin tuna and smaller than bluefins. They will school with other tunas including yellowfin, true albacore and skipjack, and with non-tunas like wahoo. Although bigeyes average 100 pounds — twice the size of yellowfins — you can quickly tell the stubby, fat bigeyes during a multi-strike blitz; they charge off straight away on the surface rather than diving. […]

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Piers damaged, southern OBX still closed except to residents

After Hurricane Sandy’s winds, waves, rain and beach- and road-eating waves, the main problem for fishermen on the Cape Hatteras National Seashore is lack of access.

The Herbert C. Bonner Bridge that spans Oregon Inlet was closed to automobile traffic for a week after the storm while engineers did safety checks, and the N.C. Department of Transportation said the bridge will remain closed until NC 12 is repaired to the south.
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Featured

Billfish, dolphin key Outer Banks bluewater action

Fishing is jumping at Hatteras, and so are some of the fish.

Offshore fishing at the edge of the Gulf Stream is going strong, and dolphin and billfish – two fish that jump and run and really test a fisherman’s desire – are at the heart of it. The difference is at the end of the fight, the billfish are released to thrill someone else, while dolphin go in the fish box for filets to take home.

“We have some really good offshore fishing right now,” said Capt. Bruce Armstrong, Jr. […]

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Outer Banks residents, businesses take big hit from final NPS decision on beach driving

The National Park Service announced on Jan. 23 its final rule for off-road beach driving and public beach access at Cape Hatteras National Seashore, and, as expected, it drew mixed reviews from Outer Banks residents, businesses and environmental groups.

“It’s a lot worse than the injunction (that set up interim beach-driving and public-access rules),” said Frank Folb, owner of Fran & Frank’s tackle store at Avon. […]

Featured Story

October, November are top months for reds in OBX surf

Each fall after the first cold snaps of October, red drum pour out of the inlets and swim along Outer Banks beaches.

“After the first few northeast blows happen each year, people catch a few drum off the Avalon and Kitty Hawk piers or down at Oregon Inlet,” said Frank Folb Jr., of Frank &Fran’s Tackle Shop at Avon, who said drum move out of Oregon Inlet into the ocean, then turn south and head for the beaches of Cape Hatteras National Seashore. Drum also move through Hatteras, Ocracoke and Drum inlets into the Atlantic Ocean.

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