Ware Shoals hunter kills big hog on night hunt

hog
Cody Strickland likes hunting hogs at night, and he has the right equipment for it.

It was the hunter’s 39th hog of the year

Cody Strickland of Ware Shoals is doing his part to control the wild hog population in his neck of the woods. He killed his 39th hog of the year on a recent hunt.

After his friend’s SPYPOINT trail camera alerted him five mornings in a row with some pig photos, they decided they’d be there to meet the swine on morning number six.

“I set my alarm for 4 a.m., and met my friend at the Hot Spot off of Hwy. 25 in Princeton. We proceeded to our spot in the woods just below the store there,” he said.

The wild hogs showed up right on time. And both hunters took care of business using some high-tech equipment.

“We had a group come in around 5:30 a.m., and we both took hogs using thermal and night vision scopes,” he said.

Strickland’s boar was his personal best, a 363.5-pound hog. His boar-killing weapon is a predator hunter’s dream firearm.

“I took this boar using an AR-platform 6.5 Grendel, 110-grain Controlled Chaos Lehigh Defense ammo, and an ATN 4K Pro Optic paired with a Sniper Hog Light 66LRX infrared light,” he said.

Wild hogs are a nuisance, and can spread disease to humans

Wild hogs are present in all 46 of South Carolina’s counties. They do a lot of damage to food plots and native plant species. And they carry swine brucellosis, a disease that can be transmitted to humans and cause flu-like symptoms.

Along with coyotes and armadillos, wild hogs are always in season on private land in South Carolina. And the state has very liberal regulations on hunting them. Baiting and the use of electronic calls are both legal. Licensed hunters may hunt hogs with any legal firearm, bow and arrow, or crossbow, even at night on registered private property.

For more information about hog hunting in South Carolina, and to register your land for night hunting, click here.

Click here to learn about how one Carolina deer hunter benefitted greatly from thinning out his wild hog population.

Brian Cope
About Brian Cope 1400 Articles
Brian Cope of Edisto Island, S.C., is a retired Air Force combat communications technician. He has a B.A. in English Literature from the University of South Carolina and has been writing about the outdoors since 2006. He’s spent half his life hunting and fishing. The rest, he said, has been wasted.

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