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  • The NCBA 'Saltwater (Bowfishing)Bash and Fish Fry' is next weekend. OPEN to ALL.. Contact Joey Thompson for additional info at ncbawhitetail@yahoo.com or: 336-972-1486.
    Ramon Bell
    336-643-4455
    ******************

    From the NC Bowhunters Association Facebook page:
    Joey Thompson
    May 29 at 4:38pm
    June 6-7 at Emerald Isle...Can't wait to sling another arrow at the big Rays again. Last year we broke 5 State Records at this event and the World Record Southern Ray holder Josh Hether will be with us if you want to get educated on what a monster Ray looks like! The food will be worth your trip, hope to see you all there!!

    — with Andy Smith and 5 others.
    June 6-7 at Emerald Isle...Can't wait to sling another arrow at the big Rays again. Last year we broke 5 State Records at this event and the World Record Southern Ray holder Josh Hether will be with us if you want to get educated on what a monster Ray looks like! The food will be worth your trip, hope to see you all there!!

    GOTO our Facebook page for Location and Registration info..

    June 01, 2014 at 8:08am

    The 2014-15 NCWRC Proposals H9 & H10 will allow Stand-Still Hunters statewide to take a Bear over Non-Processed Bait, as long as they are not eating it at the time of the shot. More importantly, H10 opens up the Bear season in all Piedmont Counties to take a bear anytime a bear season is open in the Eastern or Western county. The WRC does not want the bear population to expand into Piedmont counties. We have onlt TWO days to vote on these proposals.. Non-Hunters and Anti-Hunters, along with some bear hunters in the eastern and western counties do NOT want the average stand/still hunter to have an equal opportunity to harvest a bear in N.C. This may be our ONLY chance to get this law changed for some time! Go to www.ncwildlife.org today and vote FOR Proposals H9 & H10. The voting is running 3 to 1 against these proposals. AGAIN...IF YOU WANT TO HAVE AN OPPORTUNITY TO LEGALLY TAKE A BEAR SHOULD YOU SEE ONE WHILE DEER HUNTING ANYWHERE IN N.C. WHILE STAND OR STILL HUNTING, VOTE IN FAVOR OF THESE TWO PROPOSALS TODAY!

    February 12, 2014 at 11:46am

    Wildlife Poacher Reward Fund; § 113-294.1.

    Gov. McCrory signed a bill into law on July 29th that will have a very positive effect on helping apprehend poachers and illegal hunters. At our (NCBA's) request, House Rep. John Faircloth and former NCWRC Exec. Director, Dick Hamilton, got a bill drafted and presented it to the NC Legislature to create a 'Poacher Reward Fund' that will be administered by the NC Wildlife Resources Commission. Money to support the fund will come from wildlife law violators who are required to pay 'Restoration Fees' to the NCWRC. Under the scope of this law, the court can also add an additional fee to cover the amount of the reward, as suggested by the NCWRC. In effect, the perpetrator will be required, as terms of his probation, to pay his own reward to the person who turned him in. There is NO limit to the amount of the reward the court can impose. Col. Caveny advised that rewards would be offered in only the more serious violations. A schedule or list of these violations will be formulated later. This law is likely the strongest 'Poacher Reward' law in any state in the country. It is long overdue. NCBA funded the 'ONLY' Poacher Reward Fund in N.C. for 37 years. Over that time NCBA and it's members paid out over $60,000 in rewards from it's own 'Anti-Poacher Reward Fund' in rewards to people. We are very pleased that Rep. Faircloth's work on this bill were successful, and we (NCBA) are very proud to have been a part of it.

    Ramon Bell, Past President, NCBA
    336-643-4455
    *******************
    General Statute § 113-294.1. Wildlife Poacher Reward Fund, reads as follows:

    GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF NORTH CAROLINA
    SESSION 2013
    SESSION LAW 2013-380
    HOUSE BILL 936
    *H936-v-5*
    AN ACT TO ESTABLISH A WILDLIFE POACHER REWARD FUND TO PAY REWARDS TO PERSONS WHO GIVE INFORMATION TO LAW ENFORCEMENT AUTHORITIES THAT RESULTS IN THE ARREST AND CONVICTION OF PERSONS WHO COMMIT SERIOUS WILDLIFE VIOLATIONS, TO AUTHORIZE THE USE OF COMPENSATION PAID TO THE WILDLIFE RESOURCES COMMISSION AS CONDITIONS OF OFFENDERS' PROBATION AS ASSETS OF THE FUND, TO AMEND THE BOATING SAFETY ACT BY INCREASING THE FINES AND OTHERWISE AMENDING THE PENALTY AND OTHER PROVISIONS OF THAT ACT, AND TO AMEND THE PENALTY PROVISIONS FOR SPECIFIC VIOLATIONS OF THE WILDLIFE LAWS.
    The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts:
    SECTION 1. Article 22 of Chapter 113 of the General Statutes is amended by adding a new section to read:
    § 113-294.1. Wildlife Poacher Reward Fund.
    (a) There is established in the Office of the State Treasurer the Wildlife Poacher Reward Fund. Monies in the Fund shall be used to pay rewards to persons who provide information to the Wildlife Resources Commission or to law enforcement authorities that results in the arrest and conviction of persons who have committed criminal offenses involving the taking, injury, removal, damage, or destruction of wildlife resources. The Wildlife Resources Commission shall adopt rules for the administration of the Fund for these purposes.
    (b) The assets of the Wildlife Poacher Reward Fund shall be derived from the following:
    (1) A percentage of the compensation paid annually to the Commission as special conditions of offenders' probation in criminal cases involving the taking, injury, removal, damage, or destruction of wildlife pursuant to G.S. 15A-1343(b1)(5), to be set by the Commission at not less than ten percent (10%) of those amounts paid as replacement costs and investigative costs.
    (2) All amounts paid to the Commission under G.S. 15A-1343(b1)(5) as compensation for rewards paid from the Fund.
    (3) The proceeds of any gifts, grants, and contributions to the State which are specifically designated for inclusion in the Fund.
    (4) Any other sources specified by law.'
    SECTION 2. G.S. 15A-1343(b1) reads as rewritten:
    '(b1) Special Conditions. – In addition to the regular conditions of probation specified in subsection (b), the court may, as a condition of probation, require that during the probation the defendant comply with one or more of the following special conditions:
    …
    (5) Compensate the Department of Environment and Natural Resources or the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, as the case may be, for the replacement costs of any marine and estuarine resources or any wildlife resources which were taken, injured, removed, harmfully altered, damaged or destroyed as a result of a criminal offense of which the defendant was convicted. If any investigation is required by officers or agents of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources or the Wildlife Resources Commission in determining the extent of the destruction of
    Page 2 Session Law 2013-380 House Bill 936-Ratified
    resources involved, the court may include compensation of the agency for investigative costs as a condition of probation. The court may also include, as a condition of probation, compensation of an agency for any reward paid for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the offender. This subdivision does not apply in any case governed by G.S. 143-215.3(a)(7)...

    Click on this link for a complete copy of this law.

    http://ncleg.net/Sessions/2013/Bills/House/PDF/H936v5.pdf

    August 10, 2013 at 6:24am

    NCBA's Becoming a Bowhunter' Program begins!

    NCBA's BABINC program has begun! The goals and objectives of the program have not changed. But, the process of accomplishing these goals have changed considerably! Here is how it works:

    Potential students must now complete a Pre-Registration Form (found on our webpage)and send it to the Chairman. They are sent, via email, an introductory package of information. BABINC Regional Coordinators are sent the same information along with a copy of the students Pre-Registration Form. The Region Coordinator (RC) will then assign the student to a Mentor.

    Students are required to take the 'Basic Hunter Safety Course' before beginning the BABINC Level #1 Course. After completion of the Level #1 course, they must complete the 'IBEP' course before beginning the Level #2 Course. We provide a course 'Outline and Record Form' to keep up with the progress of the student in all three Levels of the BABINC Program.

    Level #3 completes the course when the student takes a big game bowhunt for whitetail deer, monitored by a NCBA Guide/Mentor or a licensed commercial guide.

    Right now, we need many more volunteer Mentors to be prepared to handle the students that will be applying for the program once we begin advertising it to the general public.

    Mentors do NOT need to be certified instructors, just experienced bowhunters who are willing to work with others to help them 'learn the basics' of bowhunting.

    We are looking for people who must be a NCBA member, (to be covered by our liability insurance,) who are willing to work with our students; adults and youths, male and female, who want to learn to bowhunt.

    We want to 'fill the gap, one step at a time,' to help people learn to hunt with a bow and arrow. We want to provide help to those who want to learn to hunt and do not have a friend or family member to mentor them.

    We feel that working '1 on 1' with students is the way to go with this program. It will be a very rewarding and FUN experience for the student and the mentor alike to bring the joy and feeling of accomplishment to others who may never have the chance to learn any other way.

    If you are interested in serving as a BABINC Mentor, (or a certified BABINC Instructor), email me at education@ncbowhunter.com, or call me at 336-643-4455 (Home); or 567-703-NCBA (6222) (Cell) for more information about becoming a part of the NCBA-BABINC Volunteer team.
    Thanks.
    Ramon Bell, BABiNC Chairman

    June 07, 2013 at 8:51am

    NCBA offers Bill to create a 'Poacher Reward Fund (HB 936)

    This bill, proposed by NCBA, places the burden of supporting the 'Poacher Reward Fund' directly on the people who should be paying for it ... that being those who make the conscious and deliberate decision to flaunt our wildlife laws and abuse our precious wildlife resources without any show of concern or remorse for their actions. Justice will be best served by placing the burden to fund the reward program directly on these people who have no respect for the law or for our wildlife resources. That is what this bill does, and it gives the NCWRC the authority and monetary resources to run it. We (NCBA) intend to make an annual donation to the fund, and we think other wildlife and conservation organizations, companies, industries and individuals will do the same. We hope this fund will draw more attention to those who give legitimate hunters a bad name and help make them pay the price for their actions.
    PLEASE contact your state Representatives and Senators and ask them to support House Bill 936, which establishes the 'Poacher Reward Fund'. Do it today.. Tomorrow may be too late! You can see and read the bill on the N.C. General Assembly website or on the NCBA Facebook page by downloading the H-936 link
    GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF NORTH CAROLINA SESSION 2013 H D HOUSE DRH80295-LLf-153A (03/28) Short Title: Wildlife Poacher Reward Fund. (Public) Sponsors: Representatives Wray, Faircloth, Moffitt, and J. Bell (Primary Sponsors). Referred to:

    *DRH80295-LLf-153A*

    A BILL TO BE ENTITLED 1
    AN ACT TO ESTABLISH A WILDLIFE POACHER REWARD FUND TO PAY REWARDS 2 TO PERSONS WHO GIVE INFORMATION TO LAW ENFORCEMENT 3 AUTHORITIES THAT RESULTS IN THE ARREST AND CONVICTION OF PERSONS 4 WHO COMMIT SERIOUS WILDLIFE VIOLATIONS AND TO AUTHORIZE THE USE 5 OF COMPENSATION PAID TO THE WILDLIFE RESOURCES COMMISSION AS 6 CONDITIONS OF OFFENDERS' PROBATION AS ASSETS OF THE FUND. 7
    The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts: 8
    SECTION 1. Article 22 of Chapter 113 of the General Statutes is amended by 9 adding a new section to read: 10
    '§ 113-294.1. Wildlife Poacher Reward Fund. 11
    (a) There is established in the Office of the State Treasurer the Wildlife Poacher 12 Reward Fund. Monies in the Fund shall be used to pay rewards to persons who provide 13 information to the Wildlife Resources Commission or to law enforcement authorities that 14 results in the arrest and conviction of persons who have committed criminal offenses involving 15 the taking, injury, removal, damage, or destruction of wildlife resources. The Wildlife 16 Resources Commission shall establish rules for the administration of the Fund for these 17 purposes. 18
    (b) The assets of the Wildlife Poacher Reward Fund shall be derived from the 19 following: 20
    (1) A percentage of the compensation paid annually to the Commission as 21 special conditions of offenders' probation in criminal cases involving the 22 taking, injury, removal, damage, or destruction of wildlife pursuant to 23 G.S. 15A-1343(b1)(5), to be set by the Commission at not less than ten 24 percent (10%) of those amounts paid as replacement costs and investigative 25 costs. 26
    (2) All amounts paid to the Commission under G.S. 15A-1343(b1)(5) as 27 compensation for rewards paid from the Fund. 28
    (3) The proceeds of any gifts, grants, and contributions to the State which are 29 specifically designated for inclusion in the Fund. 30
    (4) Any other sources specified by law.' 31
    SECTION 2. G.S. 15A-1343(b1) reads as rewritten: 32
    '(b1) Special Conditions. – In addition to the regular conditions of probation specified in 33 subsection (b), the court may, as a condition of probation, require that during the probation the 34 defendant comply with one or more of the following special conditions: 35
    … 36

    April 13, 2013 at 10:29am

    Register for Becoming a Bowhunter in N.C. (BABINC) on NCBA Webpage:

    Do you know someone who wants to learn to bowhunt? Tell them to go to our webpage at www.ncbowhunter.com

    and click on the link to the 'Pre-Registration Form'. It is located under the 'Becoming a Bowhunter' section where it says 'Click HERE to Register'. Registrants will receive confirmation and pre-class 'Study Guides' to read, study and bring to the classes with them. Any NCBA members interested in volunteering to work with the BABINC program should email to education@ncbowhunter.com .

    We need certified Hunter Safety and IBEP Instructors to work with Level #1, #2 & #3 students, and bowhunting 'Mentors' to work with students as guide (mentors) in Level #2 and #3 classes. Level #2 will conduct 'simulated' bowhunts that involve scouting; selecting stand sites; placement and use of stands and safety climbing equipment; shot selection at 3D deer targets on a 3D range, and from stands under simulated hunting conditions. Finally, in the Level #3 class, they will participate in a 'REAL' big game hunt for whitetail deer and any other animal they may see that is 'in season' at the time. Basically, our 'Instructors' and 'Mentors' will be serving the same purpose our parents, family and friends did for us. In fact, 'photo hunts' will be conducted any time of the year! Students will be required to take photos of any deer they see that offered the best shot opportunities and be graded on the shot opportunities they would or would not take, based on the shot angle and distance. They would also learn to field dress and butcher the deer they shoot to get the deer from 'Field to Freezer.'

    April 13, 2013 at 10:03am

    NCBA INDUCTS 3 INTO 'HALL of FAME

    The North Carolina Bowhunters Association (NCBA) inducted three people into their 'Hall of Fame' after a two year lapse in activity at their Annual Banquet in the Kerr-Scott Building at the Dixie Deer Classic in Raleigh on March 2, 2013. Jerry Elijah Rushing, Charles 'Jack' Smith and Donald 'Wayne' Smith are the inductees. All were unanimous choices for inclusion into the 'NCBA Hall of Fame.'

    Two of these were founders of the NCBA, and were long overdue for recognition. Jerry Elijah Rushing was the initial 'Founder' of the association in 1972. He served as president for the first 3-4 years. Interest in the fledgling association initially ballooned to over 100 members. In an interview with Jerry in October of 2012, Jerry said: 'The association grew too fast for us. We just weren't 'smart' enough to know what to do with it! After a 3 year 'Lull' in activity, Jerry asked Jack Smith to take the reins of the association and try to reorganize and salvage it. So, that is what he did. Jack regained control of the corporate charter with the N.C. Dept. of State and reactivated it. They re-elected new Executive Council Officers, re-wrote the bylaws and covenant of the NCBA, and they were on their way.

    Jerry Rushing led a storied life as a young man. He was what came to be known as a 'Moonrunner'. A movie of that name was made about this He hauled 'Moonshiner' for a living for years, driving a modified 1958 Chrysler 300-D with one of the original 'Hemi' engines. It was capable of speeds up to 140 mph+, much faster than anything the 'Revenooers' had at that time. He named his car 'Traveller', after General Robert E. Lee's favorite horse. If any of this sounds familiar, the TV and movie series, 'Dukes of Hazard', was modeled after Jerry Rushing's life. Jerry also ran the NASCAR circuit in it's early years from 1950-62. Jerry also took the first Black Bear in N.C. with a bow & Arrow in 1971. It scored 18 7/16' and is in the P&Y Record book. There is much more to this story that can be read on the NCBA webpage under the 'History' Link at: www.ncbowhunter.com.

    Wayne Smith is HOF member #27. Wayne is simply a hard-working NCBA member who is also a very good bowhunter. He holds the NCBA state record for Red Fox, and one year, he recorded 27 groundhog kills with his bow, along with a Pronghorn Antelope he 'ground stalked' in Wyoming on a hunt he won at the NCBA Banquet. It also made the P&Y Record Book listings.

    NCWRC officer Peter Herron was honored as the 'NCBA Law Enforcement Officer of the Year.' Greg Batts was recognized as the 'NCBA Biologist of the Year.'

    John Thompson and Richard Burkett were presented with the 'NCBA Gold Arrow Award', and I was honored to be presented the 'Fred Bear Award' for Service to NCBA and Bowhunting in North Carolina.

    Bowhunting Awards were presented to NCBA members who had harvested animals and fish in all the different species for the year 2012. Bill Howard was named the 'Adult Male Bowhunter of the Year.' Teena Koury won the 'Adult Female BH of the Year', and Cole Miller won the 'Youth Male BH of the Year.' We had no nominations for 'Youth Female BH of the Year.'

    Entertainment was provided by country singer Colton James, who performed several shows at the DDC over the weekend to benefit our 'Wounded Warriers.'

    Other noted attendees at the banquet were Gene and Barry Wensel and Tom Miranda, along with 200+ members of the best Bowhunting organization in the U.S.A. If you missed it, you missed the best bowhunting show of the year in North Carolina.

    March 14, 2013 at 11:24am

    NCBA RECOGNIZES WRC OFFICERS at AWARDS BANQUET

    The North Carolina Bowhunters Association (NCBA) honored employees of the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission at their Annual Banquet in the Kerr-Scott Building at the Dixie Deer Classic in Raleigh on March 2, 2013.

    Two officers with the NCWRC were recognized for outstanding service to sportsmen, citizens and to the wildlife resources of the state of North Carolina.

    NCWRC Wildlife Enforcement Officer Peter Herron from District 6 was honored as the 'NCBA Law Enforcement Officer of the Year.' Mickey Strader, NCBA Youth Ed Co-Chair, presented the award to Officer Herron. In addition to performing his daily enforcement duties, Officer Herron is actively involved in Youth Education activities teaching future hunters about the use of hunting, and especially bowhunting, through the NASP program in schools.

    Dennis McClure (Right), presents the 'NCBA Biologist of the Year Award' to District 3 Biologist, Greg Batts. Batts attended numerous meetings with residents of communities and town councils to offer information and advice about the benefits of utilizing bowhunting and other viable options as useful and effective tools to help manage and control the whitetail deer population in their communities.

    We extend our thanks and gratitude to these men and to the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission for their efforts to protect our wildlife resources.

    Andy N. Smith, President / NCBA

    March 14, 2013 at 9:01am

    NEWS MEDIA BRIEF;

    BECOMING A BOWHUNTER IN North Carolina'

    The North Carolina Bowhunters Association (NCBA), a Non-Profit organization, has a new program named: 'Becoming a Bowhunter in North Carolina.'(BABINC). If interested in this program, send an email to: education@ncbowhunter.com with your name, phone, email and county of residence to add your name to a list of students to be included in one of our Level #1 classes. You will be contacted when a class is scheduled in your area. There is no charge for the Level #1 class, but we will accept donations to cover the administrative costs of the class, and we encourage everyone to join NCBA to be covered by our hunting and outdoor activity liability insurance.

    The program will address how to dress and butcher a deer. This process has been lost in today's society. Rising food prices and concerns about eating meat from domestic livestock given food with additives to accelerate growth and medicines to keep them healthy. Venison offers a natural alternative and a solution to these concerns, especially since we now have a problem, (or natural gift?) of having a supply of clean, lean and high protein food inhabiting our neighborhoods. NCBA can help you learn to bowhunt and process your deer harvest, or provide certified, insured bowhunters to do it for you.
    NCBA has regional coordinators, instructors and mentors in our BABINC program in your area. We also have certified and insured BCRS bowhunters all across the state who are willing to help you put venison in your freezer and help you learn about bowhunting yourself, if you are interested!
    Each mature deer yields about 50 pounds of lean, high protein meat that will feed your family and save hundreds of dollars every year in grocery bills.
    Bowhunting is a safe, ethical and humane way to control the deer population in urban and rural habitats. Modern archery equipment, in the hands of a trained and skilled bowhunter will dispatch a deer very quickly. Our Level #2 and #3 classes will address these concerns in depth.

    If you are a bowhunter, and are interested in getting involved as an instructor or mentor, you can contact me at the phone number and email below.

    If you would like to talk about any of our programs, give me a call. My cell # is 567-703-6222, or email to: education@ncbowhunter.com.

    If you have access to property to bowhunt, we can almost guarantee you will receive venison to fill your freezer. Contact Dennis McClure at: bcrs@ncbowhunter.com or 336-377-9114 to register land with the NCBA-BCRS Program and enlist the services of a certified and insured NCBA-BCRS Bowhunter.

    Go to our webpage at: www.ncbowhunter.com

    and read the links for 'BCRS' and 'Becoming a Bowhunter' for more information on these two NCBA programs.

    March 09, 2013 at 1:21pm

    'OPEN LETTER' to Opponents and Proponents of the urban archery deer season.
    Dennis McClure and Ramon Bell both wrote letters to Bob Wilson in response to his article that was published in the Durham News the week of February 10th. Dennis is Chairman of the NCBA-BCRS Program. Ramon is Past President of NCBA.
    Below is the response letter Dennis wrote:
    Mr. Wilson, Thank you for your informative article; “Bow and arrow deer hunt on target” on February 14, 2013. I am Chairman of the 'NCBA Bowhunter Certification and Referral Service', or 'BCRS' program for short. Our 'Certified' NCBA-BCRS members are specifically tasked with providing a free service to any citizen or municipality of North Carolina who is experiencing the negative effects of an overpopulation of whitetail deer. Our BCRS members have been subjected to more classroom education than any concealed weapons permit holder in the state is required and they are covered by a liability insurance policy (up to $2 million) that rivals that of licensed drivers on our roads. Our members are scientists, doctors, lawyers, financial managers, police officers, firefighters, as well as active-duty and retired military; plumbers, construction workers, and other retirees. They are some of the very people we trust most with the protection and security of our families and communities. Wildlife management is an unfortunate, but necessary task that humans must implement to compensate for our insatiable need for urban living. We continue to develop housing that infringes further into our rural areas that deprives wildlife of their natural habitat and reduces the carrying capacity to adequately support healthy living for wildlife. Other management tools are too expensive and not nearly effective as hunting. We (NCBA) often meet our landowner clients through state wildlife biologists who recognize our impeccable safety record, the cost-effectiveness of implementing such a vital plan, and the rewards of feeding one another that hunting provides. There is a biological science behind what we do and every technological advancement made in our equipment is geared toward the desire to dispatch animals in the most humane method possible. We facilitate our services from elevated tree stands, aiming downward at distances that rarely exceed 35 yards. The meat that is harvested from our hunts is 100% organic, low-fat, nutritious protein that is donated to food banks, charities, as well as our own 'Deer Donation Registry' and the landowners themselves. None is wasted. We understand that we will never win the hearts and minds of our critics and animal rights groups. Personally, I spend many hours each year speaking with communities about the damage being inflicted to property and people by deer through vehicle collisions, botanical damage, and parasite infestation. I repeatedly remind citizens that if they wear leather, eat meat, or use cosmetics, that the trauma inflicted to animals in bringing these necessities and luxuries to market are due to the necessity of implementing an economical and effective wildlife management program. In my experiences of talking with communities, our most ardent critics are against hunting but rarely offer any realistic and economically feasible alternatives in place of bowhunting as a viable solution. They simply do not like seeing “Bambi” being killed. The rationale of “Bambi” dying slowly by disease or starvation is a case on point. Themselves not realizing the damage inflicted in doing so. In effect, they are creating temporary and artificial sanctuaries and habitat that does more harm than help in the long run. ALL cities should prohibit the use of feeding stations for deer except for baiting needed to assist bowhunters in harvesting them. From a statewide perspective, the facts are very clear with 39 municipalities across the state implementing an urban archery season to date. This is because our safety record speaks for itself as well as the economics of financially-strapped localities searching for solutions that are in the best interest of the taxpayers both financially and socially. Only one town rescinded the law solely because too many hunters were calling them to ask for help in finding property to hunt on. Some cities have enacted a local license requirement that helps generate revenue and gives them the opportunity to monitor who and how many bowhunters are participating in the urban archery season. It is very easy to say, “let's agree to disagree” in order to avoid a debate on the matter. However, there simply isn’t a better solution to the overpopulation of deer in terms of liability, economics and feasibility than bowhunting. Our current population of deer in North Carolina stands at about 1.5 million to which 120 days of regular hunting season has proven to be insufficient in managing the growing problem. We suggest that the NCWRC expand the urban archery season to include approval by counties as well as municipalities, especially in those counties that encompass larger cities like Mecklenburg, Forsyth, Guilford and Wake counties. Respectfully,
    Dennis S. McClure, NCBA-BCRS Chairman
    645 Shellhabour Blvd.
    Rural Hall, North Carolina 27045
    bcrs@ncbowhunter.com
    Web: www.ncbowhunter.com

    February 17, 2013 at 1:43pm

    The 'North Carolina Bowhunters Association' announces the creation of a NEW program designed for anyone who is interested in learning or improving their hunting, and specially bowhunting skills. It is entitled:

    'BECOMING A BOWHUNTER in NORTH CAROLINA'

    In 2004, NCBA began a journey toward creating one of the most significant and valuable programs since it’s creation in 1975… 29 years earlier. This was the approval of the “NCBA Land Acquisition Fund.” (LAF) It took a while for the fund to catch on and really begin showing any real growth. Eight years later (2012), the fund has grown to the point that we are ready to seriously look at purchasing the property we plan to use for this program and other NCBA activities. All donations to the NCBA-LAF are an investment in the future of Bowhunting for youths and adults alike in North Carolina. Anyone interested in volunteering to work with this program should email us at: president@ncbowhunter.com with your name, phone and email address. We will send you more information on the program and add your name to the list of volunteers interested in working with this program.

    February 09, 2013 at 8:54am

    WHY HAVE HUNTER LIABILITY INSURANCE?
    By: Ramon Bell, President, North Carolina Bowhunters Association

    Every hunter should be covered by a hunter liability insurance policy, no matter where they hunt. Here's why. Our (NCBA’s) insurance representative told me that the most common claim they receive results from damage (or injury) resulting from a deer being shot, then running across a road and being struck by a motor vehicle. Were you aware that the hunter can be held civilly liable in these instances? Any damage done by a deer after you shoot it, or even shoot at it, can be the basis for a civil claim or law suit against you. We are not so much concerned with the accidental shooting of another hunter or livestock with a bow and arrow. It just doesn’t happen at the close ranges of a bowhunter. But it does happen on occasion with firearms at longer ranges through mistaken identity. We had a case a few years ago where a NCBA member shot a neighbor's dog, mistaking it for a coyote. He was not sued, but the neighbor did sign a criminal warrant on him for some minor violation. Hunter liability insurance does not cover violations of the law. Another NCBA member shot a doe with his muzzle loader and the deer ran over 300 yards before expiring. He trailed and found it dead, lying on the centerline of a two-lane paved rural highway. The point is that incidents happen that can put any hunter in a position to be the defendant in a civil suit.

    NCBA annual membership carries $100,000 in hunter liability insurance that covers bow and gun hunting civil claims as long as your membership is ACTIVE at the time the incident occurs. If you place your hunting properties in the BCRS program, you and the landowner are also covered for up to $2 million for bowhunting only. The only requirement is that all hunters on that property must be NCBA & BCRS certified members. You retain complete control of who hunts the property and when, and the terms and details of the BCRS agreement are strictly confidential.

    Questions? Contact me at president@ncbowhunter.com or Dennis McClure at bcrs@ncbowhunter.com . For more information on joining NCBA and the BCRS program, go to our website at www.ncbowhunter.com and click on the 'BCRS' link or the 'Join the NCBA' link.

    December 24, 2012 at 8:24am

    CRIMESTOPPERS PAYS FOR WILDLIFE VIOLATIONS !

    It is not widely known, but your local CRIMESTOPPERS Organization pays rewards for wildlife violations, NOT just for criminal offenses. And, two good points are that a court conviction is not required, AND the identity of the reporting person is kept anonymous. I add that WL Officers have told me that they don't always need a name. They need to know where the violator is taking the deer to skin and dress it, or where they are shooting the deer. They can concentrate their patrol time checking these spots for illegal activity.

    December 06, 2012 at 8:00am

    It is common knowledge that NCBA-BCRS certified bowhunters are the ones hunting Duke Forest, as it has been publicized in several Triangle newspapers and broadcast on Raleigh-Durham TV stations as well for several years. We don't discuss the details of our NCBA-BCRS contracts in public, but the one at Duke Forest was just not possible to keep quiet for long. I have been involved with this agreement from day one with the biologist at Duke Forest. The deer population density was estimated at about 80 per square mile when we first began hunting it about 5 years ago. When we first began hunting this property, there were no fawns at all. Ribs were showing on every deer and kidneys on all deer were 'poor' condition. (We utilized the WRC's DMAP program, and collected this data on every deer taken along with weight and jaw bones. Today, all deer taken are in 'Good' condition or better. This year, they actually cut back on the number of hunters we allow to participate in the hunt, and the season opening and closing dates were shortened by a week on the opening and closing dates. The BCRS program has had a definite and noticeable effect on the health and numbers of the deer herd at Duke Forest and on other properties we have hunting agreements with. But, it doesn't happen overnight, and the program must be maintained year after year to keep the pressure on the herd. Anyone who wants more information on our BCRS program can email me at president@ncbowhunter.com and I will send information. Also, go to our website at www.ncbowhunter.com and click on the BCRS link for more information. Ramon Bell, President/NCBA.

    December 05, 2012 at 10:00am

    NC Wildlife Resources Commission Proposals Relax Deer Depredation Rules

    The NCWRC will present proposals at statewide District Public Input meetings in September that will relax the Rules and Regulations that govern the issuance and guidelines for wildlife depredation permits. Here's how the proposals read:

    H19.Reduce requirements for obtaining a permit in cases of depredation (causing damage) and allow for better use of wildlife taken under depredation permits by making the following changes:

    * remove the requirement that an animal cause at least $50.00 in damage before the property owner can receive a depredation permit and allow for a permit to be written for any amount of damage;

    H20.Reduce restrictions for taking wildlife in the act of depredation (causing

    damage) without a permit and allow for better use of animals taken while causing damage by making the following changes:

    * remove the limit on the number of deer taken without a permit that can be retained for food. Deer may only be taken without a permit while in the act of damaging property;

    * allow feral swine taken without a permit to be retained for food;

    * allow the use of artificial lights in taking wildlife in the act of depredation without a permit.

    Justification:A number of restrictions for taking wildlife in the act of causing damage are not necessary to properly manage our wildlife resources... Specifically:

    * there is no biological reason to limit the number of deer or feral swine taken without a permit that can be retained for food. There have been concerns about meat from animals killed while causing damage being wasted;

    * artificial lights aid landholders who take depredating wildlife after dark.

    We disagree with parts of proposal # H19 & # H20. These proposals can be read in their entirety from the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission website at: www.ncwildlife.org . Anyone can also comment on them online or write a letter to the commission.

    Allowing the use of artificial lights (spotlights) without a depredation permit is not acceptable by legal and ethical sportsmen and conservationists. This will lead to uncontrolled, unenforceable, illegal poaching and wanton killing and waste of deer, bear and other wildlife resources.

    Removing the minimum $50 depredation damage requirement and allowing the unrestricted and sometimes unlimited killing of deer and bear violates the agencies legal responsibility to manage and protect our wildlife resources in a responsible manner. Before uncontrolled sport and market hunting was outlawed by modern hunting laws in the early 1900's, buffalo, antelope, elk and deer were almost hunted into extinction. Strict hunting laws and efforts by strong wildlife conservationists like Teddy Roosevelt saved them. But, make no mistake. It can happen again.

    The proposals remove the restriction on the number of deer taken without a permit that can be retained for food, and that is a good thing! But, there is no provision that requires the landowner to make any attempt to retrieve the carcass to be utilized for food, or to require that the landowner allow others to do so. There are groups and individuals that would love to retrieve the carcasses and have the meat processed for their own use, or for distribution to people who need and could use it.

    Sadly, the current method of operation utilized by many who obtain depredation permits is to shoot deer (and bear) in fields, day and night, with a .22 caliber rifle or shotgun. Deer and bear are deliberately shot in the paunch, so they will not die on-site. They run off to a secluded location to die a slow and agonizing death. This serves two purposes:

    1- .22 caliber ammunition is cheap.

    2- The landowner doesn't have to dispose of a dead and rotting carcass in their fields.

    Anti-hunting groups are going to have a heyday with this and use this as an argument to criticize the agency and legitimate and ethical hunters as well, and rightfully so! In our opinion, this is a deplorable and unacceptable practice. The WRC should take some action to help stop this from occurring.

    We do sympathize with the farmers who suffer significant crop losses due to deer and bear depredation damage. However, these proposals are not ethically, morally or humanely acceptable as they are written now.

    The proposal says there is no biological reason to limit the number of deer that can be taken without a permit that can be retained for food.. The NCWRC is issuing depredation permits to shoot black bear and deer right now! I'm sure the WRC has conducted a study to support this position. Perhaps they will share it with us?

    Has anyone considered the moral and ethical ramifications of allowing unlimited killing of deer and bear without a depredation permit? I wonder what Aldo Leopold would say about this?'

    The WRC has said time and again it is their duty to create more hunting opportunities for all hunters. That sounds great, but these proposals are doing just the opposite. Our requests for an earlier bear season when crops are still in the field have been disregarded. Now, bears are being slaughtered with no chance or opportunity for anyone to legally hunt them.

    We offer the following suggestions for consideration that could help remedy the issues we have with these proposals:

    1- Do not eliminate the minimum $50 damage requirement to issue a depredation permit.

    2- Do not allow shooting of deer or bear without a depredation permit during day or night time.

    3- Do not allow deer or bear to be shot with a rimfire cartridge (or a shotgun), specifically a .22 caliber cartridge. They must be shot with a weapon that has the capability to kill it quickly and humanely so it can easily be retrieved.

    4- Require landowners who are issued depredation permits to make an effort to retrieve and utilize the carcass, or require that they make arrangements to allow someone else retrieve the carcass.

    September 06, 2012 at 12:10am
    A comment titled: Deer Hunting in N.C. in response to a report titled: Question about deer hunting

    Yes, specially if you know there are does in heat in the area you are hunting. Bucks will be following them all day long.. 24-7. Ramon Bell, Pres/NCBA

    September 05, 2012 at 8:45pm
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