• Volume 22 Number 8 - August 2015

    Features

    Will last year’s disease outbreak, huge acorn crop, repeat itself and affect harvest again?

    North Carolina hunters, especially those in counties hit by last year’s outbreak of epizootic hemorrhagic disease, may wonder whether or how it will affect the 2015 season.

    The S.C. Department of Natural Resources expects a stable harvest in the midst of a long-term decline in the state’s deer population.

    It’s time to plan and prepare for the 2015 deer season, with the opening of the season in a number of Lowcountry counties only a couple of weeks away. There are bows and guns to be sighted in, shooting lanes trimmed, food plots fertilized and stands to be tidied up.

    Habitat, tides, baits, nets and tackle; Jimmy Price lays out his flounder-fishing tactics.

    Fishermen flock to Capt. Jimmy Price of Southport for advice on catching flounder. He does seminars across the southeast during the offseason, and most are full of anglers willing to travel to learn his methods and laugh at his tales. 

    Sight-fishing makes catching redfish on a fly one of the biggest challenges a saltwater fisherman can face in North Carolina waters.

    Discounting summer tarpon in Pamlico Sound, trying to catch a red drum in the marsh with a fly rod may be the ultimate challenge for saltwater fishermen in North Carolina.

    Lots of fishermen like to rip the lips off a big bass, and this technique for fishing a spoon in deep water fills the bill.

    When polarized glasses become an option rather than a necessity and topwater baits and flipping lures get stowed deep in the recesses of tackle boxes, then shallow-water fishing for bass has given way to offshore structure fishing.

    Biologists in both Carolinas know how much aquatic vegetation like water willow can mean to a bass fishery. Fishermen need to learn how to make it work for them.

    Brett Collins lives in Ridgeway, S.C., a small town of about 300 just west of Lake Wateree where he’s fished since the 1960s. He’s watched the lake change through the years and said it has become a different fishery since the early 1990s, about the time the water willow arrived.

    Biologists in both Carolinas know how much aquatic vegetation like water willow can mean to a bass fishery. Fishermen need to learn how to make it work for them.

    Brett Collins lives in Ridgeway, S.C., a small town of about 300 just west of Lake Wateree where he’s fished since the 1960s. He’s watched the lake change through the years and said it has become a different fishery since the early 1990s, about the time the water willow arrived.

    Get good bait and a good depth finder and you’re on the way to sampling great August fishing on this sprawling South Carolina reservoir.

    Greet a sunrise on the lower end of Lake Hartwell this month armed with blueback herring and a good graph, and odds are, the hot fishing will rival the heat. On a good day, you’ll be off the water by mid-morning from fish-fighting exhaustion, not heat exhaustion.

    Trolling or casting tiny crankbaits and spoons, fishermen can hammer out a limit of trout on Cheoah Lake during the hottest of summer days.

    In the 1993 Warner Brothers film, “The Fugitive,” actor Harrison Ford plays Dr. Richard Kimble, wrongfully convicted for the murder of his wife, who escapes from custody and is declared a fugitive. He sets out to prove his innocence and bring those who were responsible to justice while being pursued relentlessly by a team of U.S. marshals, led by Samuel Gerard, played by actor Tommy Lee Jones.

    Special tactics, tackle are required to target big sharks from the shoreline.

    With the full moon lighting the ocean’s surface, Mike Popovich of Requiem Fishing made his way through the breaking surf in a small kayak, a large baitfish lying in the hull. The baitfish was hooked to a monofilament leader and line that stretched back to his rod and reel, which stood tall in a sand spike on the beach. 

    Go big on tackle and baits and get ready to do battle with some of South Carolina’s biggest stripers.

    In 2012, fishermen began urging South Carolina officials to put in place regulations that would turn Lake Russell, the middle lake of the three major impoundments on the Savannah River, into a trophy striped bass fishery. 

    A stealthy approach and accurate cast can put you in contact with plenty of super-shallow redfish this month.

    The boat was launched just as the tide began to rise. The full moon, a day away, promised a very high tide, and the destinations were flats where the redfish congregate during those unusual tides. The timing provided a chance to fish the flats with the water both rising into and falling out of the grass.

    Learn how to target and catch white marlin at the peak of their migration through North Carolina waters.

    They used to be known as the dog days of summer, but from Oregon Inlet to Hatteras and Cape Lookout, offshore anglers have been spoiled by a white marlin bite between July and September that is only getting better each year. 

    South Carolina's statewide deer herd is on the decline, but the Palmetto State is still a great place to chase whitetails -- as our annual deer-hunting preview explains.