• Volume 9 Number 8 - August 2014

    Features

    Statewide deer herd has come to terms with changes in habitat, presence of coyotes

    South Carolina’s deer harvest last fall was up 3.6 percent over 2012, continuing a see-saw trend over the past few years, but the state’s top deer biologist found plenty to be happy about.

    Deer season looks good, again, for North Carolina hunters

    After last season’s record harvest, hunters might expect to tag fewer North Carolina deer this fall. But the take of 188,130 deer in 2013 isn’t necessarily going to cause a decline this year because of the dynamics of deer reproduction, weather, mast production, Sunday archery hunting and expansive either-sex seasons.

    Steamy or sizzling, summer weather means bonnethead sharks in Georgetown’s inshore waters.

    During the middle of the summer along South Carolina’s beautiful shores, the mercury bubbles toward the very top of the scale, with water temperatures sky-rocketing to the mid-80s. Many fish hunker down and wait to feed until the coolest times of the day: dawn, dusk or at night. But one species with a mouth full of teeth and a spade-like head thrives in the summer heat, a perfect angling option as the summer heat sizzles.

    Find your best bottomfish in 90 to 110 feet of water off the North Carolina-South Carolina state line.

    Little River Inlet enters the Atlantic Ocean just below the state line between North Myrtle Beach, S.C., and Sunset Beach, N.C. Anglers from both states use the inlet to gain access to fabulous fishing, the most notable of which may be summer bottomfish action.

    Find your best bottomfish in 90 to 110 feet of water off the North Carolina-South Carolina state line.

    Little River Inlet enters the Atlantic Ocean just below the state line between North Myrtle Beach, S.C., and Sunset Beach, N.C. Anglers from both states use the inlet to gain access to fabulous fishing, the most notable of which may be summer bottomfish action.

    Take a flier and target great bream fishing on South Carolina’s Combahee River

    With its headwaters in Colleton County and ending at St. Helena Sound, the Combahee River — the “C” in ACE Basin — is a relatively short river, but the lack of length isn’t a negative for anglers. Fish are thick in its waters, from the freshwater sections around Yemassee all the way to the salty waters of the Atlantic Ocean.

    Topwater baits and big worms are key baits for summer trips to Goose Creek Reservoir.

    Finding a reservoir where the bass fishing is good all summer isn’t always that easy — unless you live near Charleston. Just up the road, I-26, is an excellent and often overlooked lake: Goose Creek Reservoir.

    Stick to the main river channel and fish on the bottom for Tuckertown flatheads.

    For years, a trip to Tuckertown Lake was a busman’s holiday for Stanley Correll. Now it’s just pure pleasure.

    Biologist says white perch population is peaking at Shearon Harris Lake

    It’s no secret that Shearon Harris Lake between Raleigh and Sanford is a hot spot for trophy bass and slab crappie. But another species has taken up residence in the prime liquid real estate, as anglers are collecting a rising number of white perch. Although their presence has been met with mixed emotion, one thing is for certain, they are delicious.

    Night or day, Lake Hartwell’s summer pattern for striped bass is a productive one.

    Guide Bill Plumley is more of an early bird than a night owl, and he said that when summer settles in on 56,000-acre Lake Hartwell and the recreational boating crowd tends to dominate the mid-day, he’d rather get up early and finish early than stay up all night. Fortunately, either way is productive on Hartwell, and many local guides can catch striped bass, aka rockfish, any time  of day or night.

    Put your time in fixing stands, shooting lanes and food plots and you’ll be a good ways toward a successful deer season

    My Grandpa Joe, a hickory-tough old fellow who cherished all aspects of the hunting experience, was fond of reminding me, “The hunting’s only part of it.” 

    Jet skis offer a minimalist approach to fishing, especially when you head out Beaufort Inlet for bottom-fishing around nearshore reefs.

    Something seemed out of place. While it’s not uncommon to see a personal watercraft, aka jet ski, putting in at the Newport River boat ramp near Radio Island, this one was different.

    Two species of flounder are regularly caught in North Carolina’s unique Pamlico Sound

    Guide Mitchell Blake pointed out riprap scattered up and down the bank and how the tide was concentrating the water as it flowed around the edge of one particularly large rock. After a few casts at the rock and nearby spots, something picked up the Gulp! shrimp one of Blake’s fishermen had tied on. 

    Deer season is a month away, so find out what's in store for Tarheel hunters. Targeting bottomfish is a great idea in August, whether you do it offshore on a big boat or around nearshore structure on a jet ski.