• Volume 21 Number 6 - June 2014

    Features

    Fly-fishing tackle or ultralight spinning gear is perfect for river smallmouth.

    Staring intently at the swirl along a grass line, Michael Garet of Fleetwood deftly swept his fly line up at a sharp angle and laid a hairy popping bug three feet to the right of a boulder protruding from the bank of the New River. Two twitches later, the bug was inhaled from below, not with the soft slurp of a trout, but with an aggression that could only be attributed to a smallmouth bass.

    A chunk of crab is often too difficult a temptation for a redfish to resist.

    The tide was low as Capt. Mark Stacy headed to Tubbs Inlet to spend an hour or two fishing for redfish and flounder while waiting for the tide to rise enough to reach a section of marsh near Calabash where he had plans to chase redfish on the incoming tide.

    A chunk of crab is often too difficult a temptation for a redfish to resist.

    The tide was low as Capt. Mark Stacy headed to Tubbs Inlet to spend an hour or two fishing for redfish and flounder while waiting for the tide to rise enough to reach a section of marsh near Calabash where he had plans to chase redfish on the incoming tide.

    Look for weed lines, floating debris, temperature breaks when targeting June dolphin

    For anglers around South Carolina, summer fishing breaks out this month in inshore, nearshore and offshore waters, and for the angler with a taste for grilled dolphin filets, it’s prime time to find a school of these pelagic pleasures not far from the Charleston skyline.

    Offshore captains out of Morehead City, Atlantic Beach set bait spreads to target different species.

    The seasonal rise in ocean temperature off the coastline of Atlantic Beach and Morehead City means the peak offshore fishing season has arrived at the Crystal Coast. These fertile waters feature some of the most-productive and diverse sportfishing in the country. During May and June each year, offshore waters burst with action. 

    Punch your way through the grass and catch plenty of Tuckertown bass

    Todd Gibson’s biggest challenge of the day defied him in the shallow waters of Tuckertown Lake’s Newsome Creek. The bass, which maybe weighed a couple of pounds, held tight in a small opening of a thick grass bed. Gibson threw a black and blue jig to entice a strike, only to watch the fish flare its gills as if to blow the bait away. After many casts, Gibson finally scored a strike and reeled it in.

    Noodling has nothing to do with grabbing catfish, just catching them

    Several years ago, the “noodling” fad hit the country, largely because grabbing catfish from their lairs barehanded was ready-made for the reality TV crowd.

    From bream to bull redfish, South Carolina has great fishing at dozens of state parks.

    Whether your piscatorial pursuit involves rainbow trout, largemouth bass, flathead catfish or bull redfish, South Carolina’s state parks have you covered. 

    Fish topwaters early, hook up croakers later on for Croatan, Roanoke Sound speckled trout.

    The sun was barely glowing over the horizon as Capt. Richard Andrews of Tar-Pam Guide Service headed out one June morning, looking to get an early start on speckled trout in the Roanoke and Croatan sounds around Manteo.

    South Carolina manages trout streams in three mountain counties, stocking around 800,000 fish annually.

    My hip-boots did little to stave off the cold water that rushed by as I balanced on moss-covered rocks. Ahead of me, fast, rushing riffles faded into a deep hole that swirled in different directions. Large rocks deflected the current, forming small eddies of respite behind the rushing torrent. 

    Slow-troll live or cut baits for a cooler full of Lake Gaston blue catfish.

    If you want the best-tastin’ catfish in the United States, try spiced, deep-fried chunks when you find yourself in Louisiana or walking through the doors of a restaurant that specializes in genuine Cajun soul food.

    Learn where South Carolina’s three top inshore species live and catch them all

    “You’re gonna have to horse him out of there. Don’t give him any slack,” said Capt. Addison Rupert of Charleston’s Lowcountry Outdoor Adventures, coaching a client who was hooked up with a bull redfish around some wooden structure in the Wando River. A few minutes later, Rupert hoisted the 42-inch redfish aboard, then asked his client if she was ready to go for the speckled trout and flounder. They were after an “inshore slam.”

    Huge influx of forage makes for some hungry June red drum from Wrightsville Beach to Oak Island.

    Anglers ready to test their tackle during the late-spring redfish offensive can get all the action they can stand within a 10-mile or 100-yard boat ride from Carolina Beach. 

    Redfish are the focus of a lot of fishing effort in June, but there also are some great catfishing opportunities.