• Volume 20 Number 9 - September 2013

    Features

    North Carolina game lands offer hunters plenty of options.

    North Carolina was lucky to have a far-sighted legislature that created the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission in 1947.

    Gag grouper move onto structure in 55 to 80 feet of water for two-month feeding spree.

    On a crisp, late September morning, with the sun just promising to rise, there is a flurry of activity at the Ocean Isle Fishing Center.  On the docks, Capt. Chris “O.C.” Dew and Capt. Chris Dawson are readying the World Cat and Carolina Cat for the day’s charters. 

    Gag grouper move onto structure in 55 to 80 feet of water for two-month feeding spree.

    On a crisp, late September morning, with the sun just promising to rise, there is a flurry of activity at the Ocean Isle Fishing Center.  On the docks, Capt. Chris “O.C.” Dew and Capt. Chris Dawson are readying the World Cat and Carolina Cat for the day’s charters. 

    Coastal zones producing the biggest harvest, Pee Dee zone the biggest alligators.

    When the clock struck noon, months of anticipation and preparation finally came to fruition — gear checked, licenses securedand hearts pounding in anticipation of the alligator season. Boats were lined up awaiting the nod from the local representative of the S.C. Department of Natural Resources, signaling the start of alligator season.

    Find bucks still in summer patterns and take your best shot

    Regardless of when deer begins in South Carolina — and opening day depends on where your deer stand is — hunters need an early season strategy based on the type of hunting you’ll be doing, as well as the particular sector of the state you hunt. But early season hunting, regardless of where you hunt in South Carolina, can have its rewards.

    Take advantage of opportunities early in North Carolina’s deer season; they may be the best you’ll get until November.

    The sultry remains of summer weather don’t motivate too many North Carolina hunters to slip into deer stands this month, but the bucks roaming the forests and chowing down in soybean fields are alive, well and available.

    Find a good field and have your shotgun ready for a Labor Day dove shoot.

    Labor Day and dove season marks the beginning of fall hunting. Just about anyone who hunts will join the action along a cut corn field armed with a shotgun and plenty of shells — at least on opening day. 

    Birds, baitfish, slow current are dead giveaways for concentrations of white marlin, sailfish.

    For saltwater fishermen who visit the Outer Banks regularly, September is a magical time. People from all over the world elbow their way to our docks, fill the motels, and mostly fill all the available boats.

    Look for current and cover and you’ll hang into a Blewett Falls flathead

    A day of fishing begins early for Robbie Burr of Lilesville. A catfish guide who operates Pee Dee Fishing Adventures, Burr often meets his clients somewhere around daylight, and in order to make that appointment, he typically has to be on the water several hours earlier, launch his boat and catch bait for the day’s fishing, then trailer the boat and drive to pick up his clients.

    Bulls Bay is known for shrimp and trout, and both show up in September.

    The conversation came real easy, as it does after a great day on the water when you’ve figured out what the fish wanted and have given it to them. Johnny Spitzmiller of Ambush Inshore Charters was having just that sort of conversation at the lunch counter of Sewee Outpost in Awendaw.

    SCDNR plants around 50 fields on WMAs around the state specifically for public dove shoots.

    “Mark!” “Bird!” “Bird, behind you! “Low bird, low bird, don’t shoot!” “Down the middle, high bird — nice shot!”

    North Carolina’s Fort Fisher is regularly under attack from kayak fishermen.

    Mark Patterson believes the bays at Fort Fisher are pretty close to ideal for kayak fishing. A Greensboro resident and founder of the North Carolina Kayak Fishing Association (NCKFA), Patterson fishes the area, which kayakers simply call “The Fort,” numerous times a year. 

    North Carolina's public hunting lands offer plenty of places capable of producing wall-hanger bucks.